The Colorado Kid

3 Stars

In the past few years Steven King has started to branch out and experiment with his writing. I enjoy when writers grow in their craft, allow experimentation, and ultimately mature as writers. It takes bravery and a willing to fail to attempt a book that is not in your usual vein. Few writers do this, and the business is poorer for it. Steven King has always been a pioneer, and perhaps his lead will allow other writers to branch out. Anyhow, this book, written in 2005, is billed as the beginning of a new wave of pulp fiction. It is published in paperback, with a drawing of a young woman sitting cross-legged on the front. The tag line says “Would she learn the dead man’s secret?” It’s very reminiscent of old detective novels or film noir. The story itself is rather strange, however. It’s about a young reporter in a tiny Main town who learns the local unsolved mystery from the two older reporters. That’s the story. They tell her the mystery. There’s no going out and solving it, there’s no single bit of information that she brings to the table that sums it all up. The entire book is the old men telling their young protoge a story with no real end. Steven King even writes a short chapter at the end talking about the nature of mysteries and how people always want to figure them out. He also mentions that you’d either love or hate the book. Interesting.

Advertisements
Published in: on July 17, 2007 at 7:30 pm  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://bibliophilists.wordpress.com/2007/07/17/the-colorado-kid/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: